Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN2 34
LANGUAGE
English 34
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2012 11:00pm EST
and i'll fix that. if there are improvements come a senator that you to suggest, please let us know that the insurance is required and important because the federal government is helping to fill the gap, hope to file quickly ended at the good sometimes insurance proceeds can be slow and frankly some insurance come and is there better than others about honoring the contracts they have with these businesses and that's another important oversight that i hope the committee jurisdictions, which is not this committee, can provide in this recovery. are there any other questions because i'd like to be to the second panel and give them an opportunity. anything else you will want to add quick >> no, ma'am, thank you. >> we been hit with the $60 billion request -- did that come to the white house? >> it did. the white house and appropriations committee has reviewed it. >> were part of that is attributable to her within this committee's jurisdiction. does anybody have an idea? [inaudible] [inaudible] >> -- 40 million for the economic initiatives who discuss and 10 million for the ig. >> how muc
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2012 6:00am EST
are ubiquitous parts of our communications system. they came about because of the use of unlicensed spectrum. the lot advances the use in several ways of allowing the fcc to use existing white spaces in the broadcasts than for unlicensed use, gives the sec the authority to reorganize the existing white spaces to maximize their value and perhaps most important it allows the fcc to create guard bans in the repurchased broadcast television spectrum that may be used for new unlicensed services like super why 5. this is smart spectrum policies that recognizes the increasingly interdependent nature of licensed and unlicensed operations. the bands will enhance the value of the spectrum to be auctioned by protecting it from interference and create a nationwide ban to prime spectrum that can be used for new innovation in unlicensed use. that is why i am pleased the fcc's proposed rules are faithful to congressional intent to promote innovation in unlicensed use. second, the law preserves the fcc's ability to use auction rules to promote competition in the wireless industry while insuring no single ca
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 11:00pm EST
are facing now a possible theory of stearate using chemical weapons. they should've been abolished five or 10 years ago if the treaty had been enforced. so it seems to me, go for abolition of these weapons with good, thorough verification. i worked with inf despite the fact that two or three years before we got it, but that would be acceptable. >> rick, your turn. >> as the chairman of the global stearate u.s.a., i have to agree with jack. i won't expound on that. you know, there was no way when i was deeply involved in the issue in the early 80s that i could've foreseen gorbachev. nor could i foreseen the treaty. the zero option when it was propounded was preposterous. i post it. so did the secretary of state. reviewed this and i guess this is the lesson. we view this is largely a challenge and an opportunity and strengthen the alliance. we saw ourselves under threat. the doublecheck decision on deployment of the missiles was part of a broader political military exercise to strengthen the alliance to deal with whatever the next challenge we would face from the soviet union. what i have to sa
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 2:00pm EST
. [applause] >> thank you, david, everybody for coming. today i would like to engage all of us in a discussion of the question of the book. it's an easy question to state -- i'm sorry easy to answer what should be the role of money in markets in our society? today there are fewer things that money can't buy. if you are sentenced to a jail term and california just in case that happens to anyone of you, you should know that if you don't like the standard accommodations you can buy a prison cell upgrade. it's true. for how much, do you suppose? how much do you think it costs? $5,000? $90 a night. or if you are a tourist suppose you go to washington, d.c. on the congressional hearing that there may be a very long line if it is a popular hearing. and you may not like standing in long lines you can now go to a company called line standing dhaka, and pay them a certain amount of money. they will hire someone usually a homeless person or someone that needs to work to hold the place on line for hours and hours overnight if need be. and when the hearing begins, you can take your place in the line and go
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 8:00pm EST
on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be joining us in just a second. first, welcome, all the people out in live stream land. we'll be taking your questions on hash tag "politico" breakfast. tweet us, welcome to the others watching. appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership this year, including conventions, election night, and so we're very, very excited to be ail to bring these substantive conversations about the most important issues driving washington to you, thanks to the bank of america. thank you, john, and thank you to your colleagues. you may have gotten cards. we'll be bringing you into the conversation, think about what you're going to ask. without further adieu, we'll bring in bob woodward. mr. woodward? [applause] >> thank you. saving seats with my notes. i'll pick those up. >> which is your chair? >> you get the daddy chair. >> okay, thank you, thank you. >> so the price of politics, which has become a best seller, as all your books do, looked at the last cliff negotiations over the previous grand b
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2012 11:00pm EST
protect us from other storms in the future. a while back i was talking with a good friend of mine and i asked her he was doing. his response was, compared to a? it's really a good way to look at how sandy has affected us in delaware compared to our neighbors to the north. we are doing okay. this sandy didn't spare delaware and we have produced beyond our state's ability to provide. from the moment it is clear we are in the storm's path, i've been grateful for the work of governor jack martel and his entire team. state, county, local officials, first responders, american red cross, national guard, many volunteers are hoped to protect the residents as it approached and well after it passed. president obama, fema, the rest of the administration's team working hand in glove with their state team. in this case there was really a team. as i like to say there is no i in the word team. i should have the army corps of engineers has been particular in responding to hurricane sandy. over the years, funded by a series of storm protection projects in maryland are polite, robust and strong, hea
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:30am EST
rich, rats, cross-country , the throw you don't know, and the one that brings us here, my american revolution. in mine and humble opinion each of these books is its own line and masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive. each is an investigation of the american my state and song skate into relative with the american landscape. fleet contends the obvious, whether a garbage dump comes or the species despise rodents or family richard or a transcendental and back and allows us to see what we didn't and will we couldn't will we didn't want to, the spiritual, historical, and is essential connections that exposed, so vert, demolish are comfortable presumptions and require us to perceive people and places and, yes, ra t s with fresh eyes. i have been amazed, enlightened, educated, entertained. none more so than my american revolution. until i read his book, i thought i was reasonably conversant for college graduate of 40 years ago about the american revolution. the war we all know, but mostly in massachusetts, virginia, and the carolinas. war in which the high road, no army
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00pm EST
] but these guys, the poignant testimonies you were telling us because we live in a society where here are front line first responders. these guys tell stories about intervening in petty crime. we had one of the buildings that was targeted by some people who had terroristic intents, and they're on the front lines with this. and yet we can only pay them $7 and change an hour. and they have no benefits, they have no retirement security. one guy was telling me he's worked for ten years, no health care. if he gets sick, he has to try to come to work and work through the sickness. and that's not the america that i think of. and so i'm really hoping this week just to finish the answer, the overly-long answer is to, um, really bring more attention to these problems. and right now, this session, congress is going to be debating cuts in the s.n.a.p. program. and in this time of austerity, we can't be dumb and cut things that ultimately provide long-term benefits that are really not -- entitlements, they're really investments in us and our society, and we should begin to prioritize these things federally
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 7:00pm EST
that is still with us. the volcker rule label was announced to the press by obama january 2010, paul volcker by their role. -- by the president. he heard his name and thought what is that? i think the phrase in the book describing paul volcker is the man who could find fault with the mona lisa. [laughter] he made a living saying no. goldberg 1970s one. inflation 1979. speculation 2010. the underlying story line is trust which is the title of the last chapter of the book you can go there and skip the stories obama appointed him chairman of the advisory board the former president of italy wrote paul volcker a letter that still sits in a coma frame on his desk that says we trust you. and i show how he earned the trust and to follow-up with the lessons he learned about trust and his father senior 1930 through 1950 had a quotation from george washington hanging in a frame behind his desk in a letter he wrote to his officers at the time it said do not suffer your good nature to say yes and you ought to say no. remember it is not a private cause to be injured urban if it did buy your car is" he has
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 12:00pm EST
. there are variables that will affect that that we cannot control. with the u.s. does and the international financial institutions do is going to matter. morsi cares about with the international community to cares about him. they are sensitive to that because they need outside support to get their economy back on track so there is a point of leverage. if we can use that i might be more optimistic. but in terms of a long-term goal is, it is islam for a reason and they're going to become liberals. all this talk about post islam is unrealistic because we are talking about deeply religious conservative societies where large majorities maybe they don't vote on the basis of sharia but they are sympathetic to public life and they can empower those elements of society to would push them further to the right and that isn't just egypt we see that in other countries where the democracy doesn't always have a moderating effect and they don't have a more islamic egypt and this could be somewhat liberal if not the liberal. >> thank you very much. thank you. this is a fascinating discussion and i appreciate your won
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 12:00am EST
sullivan is not the robert sullivan who is with us this evening. not exactly, but more about that in a moment. first this robert sullivan is the author of seven extraordinary books, meadowlands, the whale hunt, how do not to get rich, rats, cross-country, the thoreau you don't know and the one that brings us here to delancey st., "my american revolution." in my humble opinion each of these books is in its way a masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive, e. tizon investigation of the american mindscape and sulzgeber related with the american landscape. each confronts the obvious, where there are garbage drunk -- garbage dump or a family road trip or a transcendental windbag and allows us to see what we didn't and what we couldn't and that we did not want to, the spiritual, historical, existential connections that expose, subvert, demolish presumptions and require us to receive people and places and yes, rats with fresh eyes. i've been amazed, enlightened, educated and contained by robert sullivan's books, none more so than "my american revolution." until i read
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:00pm EST
states, et cetera, i used to be able to quote it, i don't think i can now. anyway, it's written down. and the preamble is important saying we the people. but is not the only thing. and i say that because i do think, i had a very interesting conversation in china, i thought. i've gone there twice. the first time was a few years ago, maybe eight or 10, when we went to beijing and then we went to shanghai. and in shanghai we are asked to meet with a group of businessm businessmen, and these businessmen have all been involved in the.com. they lost a lot of money. most of them have made a lot back. so they're talking, and i was fascinated with his. one of them said i prefer the cultural revolution. the others said, what? he said the cultural revolution. why? he says, because then you knew the government was the enemy, now you're not sure. [laughter] so i said you already want to bring up about a democratic system. they said yes. i'm not a law teacher. so after they say how much they're all favored the market, i said that's a very interesting question, point. i favorite. i favorite, but i'
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 9:00pm EST
the militia was a useful thing to have. they could have built the continental army with the existence of the militia and people that have been in the militia and more importantly the volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was the key. >> host: so people were using these on the frontier protecting the indians, native americans, hunting certainly, and then in the colony's some sense of responsibility for the common good. >> guest: right. the common law right to have the firearms came with a civic duty to use them when called upon. >> host: who was in charge of these? >> guest: local commanders, towns. later on became more broadbased, but as tensions and hostility is mounted between the british authorities and the colonists in approach to the revolutionary war, it was seen by many of the leaders of the time has an advantage that we americans knew how to use firearms. >> host: at this time was there organized law enforcement or was it this group of volunteers on was that all law enforcement? >> guest: depends on the size of the town but there were not armed policemen
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 6:00am EST
a city transit system where you don't have adequate capacity and passengers to use that facility, the same thing holds true anymore with passenger service. when i heard president obama and this administration, beginning to promote high speed rail, unfortunately most of the money, the $10 billion, does not go for high-speed rail. they chose instead to support almost 150 projects and that number is growing and a lot of that money has been left behind. in fact, most of the money that has been read dedicated to high speed rail has been sent back by states including my state, the state of florida, we had to switch a proposal for high-speed rail, the actual speed was 84 miles an hour. 84 miles for one hour transit the distance of the proposed link in central florida, that is not high speed. high speed -- by our definition, 110 miles per hour average. that doesn't mean the train gets up to 110, 150, 116 miles for some stretch. we are talking about the average speed. we are talking about a switch in ohio, looking at 39 miles to 58 miles an hour. that money was turned back. there was a si
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 12:00pm EST
it at times, but he also had made remarks that allowed off the militia was a useful thing to have feared it could have built the continental army that the existence of the militias and people who would than in militias and more importantly volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms and that was key. >> host: said people were using it on the frontier, protections against the native americans, hunting certainly am in the colonies, some sense of responsibility for the common good. as to exactly. the common moderate to have and use firearms became the pacific duty to use them and called upon. >> host: who was in charge of malicious? >> guest: local commander towns very often have them, new england certainly. later on they became more broadly based. but as tensions and hostilities mounted between the british authorities in the colonists and the approach to the revolutionary war, he was seen by many of the leaders at the time as an advantage that we americans knew how to use firearms. >> host: at this time, was to organize one person in these communities are with this group of voluntee
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 8:15pm EST
, in afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there. there is a big crowd on the mall. ayaan going to speak to you today about this great historic subject, this great american institution. and i am going to do it in the same way in which i organized the book. the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams and guinn for the president. instead, its slash the various parts of the day, and within each part of the day i sprinkle with vignettes some of the very serious and some of them traditional. a lot of them are all events because i'm always looking for those. i'm also going to cover some things that we are not going to see in the of coming inauguration in january because this time we don't have a change of power so we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes but nevertheless at inauguration when a president does leave office here is the white eisenhower thinking the staff at the white house. at the same time the incoming president they are leaving the house getting ready for t
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:00pm EST
around the country, paris, barack, afghanistan, people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they have all come there. there is a big crowd of a mall. of going to speak to you today about this great historic subject to my great american institution the end of not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which i organize the book rather, the book is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot of them on all events because i'm always looking for those, too. i'm also going to cover some things that were not going tessie in the upcoming in a garish in january because this time we don't have a change of power. we're not going to have the transition as we see some times. nevertheless, in the morning at inaugurations when a president does leave office, 1961, here is toyed d. eisenhower thinking the staff at the
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 10:00am EST
of you for coming here this afternoon and thank the boston book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a terrific eventsome. >> yes. [applause] >> let's also thank the plymouth rock foundation for sponsoring this particular session and say that without their generosity, it would be hard to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the city, that's the title of harvard economics professor ed glaeser's book. it's about what's made cities around the world great, about the challenges that they have had to overcome and still face. we're going to talk about b that in a few minutes in the special context of this city with our panel, and we'll take questions from you as well later. but, first, to launch us off with a presentation, here's the author, professor ed glaeser. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, bob. and thank you all so much for being here. i'm so enormo
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2012 9:00am EST
of the to u.s. patriot missile batteries as part of the nato effort to try to help protect our turkish allies against the threat of missiles from syria. even as we have asserted our strong and enduring commitment to the middle east, we are also renewing and expanding our engagement in the asia-pacific region. the core of our rebounds is modernizing our existing network of alliances and security partnerships throughout the region. and developing new security relations as well. over the past year, we reached major agreements with japan to realize our forces and jointly develop guam as a strategic hub. we afford to strengthen cooperation for the republic of korea, in space, in cyberspace, and intelligence. we begin a new marine rotational deployment to australia as well as increased air force cooperation. likewise, we are deepening our engagement and developing rotational deployment with allies and partners such as singapore and the philippines, and expanding our mil-to-mil dialogue and exchanges with china. we are also enhancing our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes reality
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 10:00pm EST
ingredient you can use in the kitchen. you can do anything to it. you can bake it, rustic, barbecue it, just amazing. >> lorraine wallace are these are recipes? >> all of my recipes and they been tried and tested and it's what i love to do. >> i am the tester. i have not cooked any of them but i had eaten everyone. >> it has family stories, family recipes and a family tip that about a. >> can you give us a little background on you two, how long you have been married? >> we have six children and we have been together for 16 years. >> but i have to say if the old-fashioned way. i had four and she had two. >> getting your family around the table and trying to figure out everybody schedule and their needs, including their husband who has 5:00 in the morning get up on sunday. it's amazing, so this great book helps you do that. >> what time do you be the chicken on sunday? >> we eat saturday night. >> soup is on sunday. >> hence the night, saturday night chicken. >> you would think i would have caught that. mr. sunday saturday night chicken, lorraine wallace, chris and lorraine wallace thank you v
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 9:00pm EST
to stop the epidemic of bullying in the u.s.. .. >> i didn't know what to do about it. all of us in this country are starting to see people coming out and talking about the experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and had i have no words for it, other than adolescence. other than going out. finally, people were starting to stand back and say that this is not actually a normal part of growing up. this is not a normal rite of passage. i think there was a moment where there is a possibility for change. the director, lee hirsch and i started talking about this. voices started bubbling up to the service. this is not something we can expect from a normal culture. in april of 2009, it was right after to young people took their lives. both of those tragedies, i think really ignited a national recognition of what was going on for so long. and we were seeing parents writing into message boards. we were seeing every news story that. hundreds of comments from parents saying that my child is going through this. kids thing that i'm going through t
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 8:00am EST
? it was something i was going back and forth. for those who use social media, things are dumb frankly. i was getting into an intellectual question about the role of government. the person said government should not provide for the nutrition of children and it struck a chord with me because i don't think people think about what that would mean. we don't realize we live in a society where we make small amount of investments early, we make big investments lake. we all in fact are deeply invested in the success of kids because the more the economy grows, artists, teachers, professors and a entrepreneurs, children are the greatest natural resource we have in america, our children. my late -- this woman says this, i go back and she says why don't we see what it is like to live on food stamps or the snap program. i went to bed thinking no big deal. it was a big story. thiokol my staff. guess what i am doing? but it was a powerful thing. one of 14 cities in america with a food policy director and we had done a lot of work when trying to expand affordable health options. i said this is a great thing. we coul
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 10:00pm EST
grouched about it at times, but he also made remarks that allowed how the militia was a useful thing to have and couldn't have bill the army without the existence of the militia and people in the militias, and more importantly, volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was key. >> host: so people used these on the frontier, protection against the indians, native americans, hunting certainly, and then during the colonies, some sense of responsibility for the common good. >> guest: exactly. the right, the common law right to have and use firearms came with a civic duty to use them when called upon. >> host: who was in charge of the militias? >> guest: well, local commanders, towns had them, in new england certainly, and later on, they became more broadly based, but as tensions and hostilities mounted between the british authorities and the colonists, the approach to revolutionary war, it was seen by many of the leaders at the time as an advantage that we americans knew how to use firearms. >> host: the -- at this time was there organized law enforcement in the commun
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:30am EST
at large and michael duffy, executive editor for time magazine chronicle the relationship between the u.s. presidents in the president's club in side the world's most exclusive fraternity. political commentator kevin phillips recounts what he believes was the most important year of the american revolution which was 1775, a good year for revolutions. for an extended list of links to various publications, 2012 novel book selections visit the book tv website, booktv.org or our facebook page facebook.com/booktv . >> up next on book tv, richard wolff and david bersamian talk about our economic crisis and argue that it can be traced back to the 1970's when our economic system shifted from benefiting a vast majority of americans to one which mostly benefits only the very rich. this is about an hour-and-a-half. [applause] >> good to see you will hear. let's cut quickly to the chase. what is it and the dna of capitalism that makes this so unstable? >> since the beginning of economics as a discipline back in the days of adam smith and david mccarty who were the first to develop it as a comprehensiv
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 11:00pm EST
a second bite at the apple for bob. >> thank you. we are all familiar with the statistics. the u.s. spends on health care than any other developed country. we hear that continuously. i was surprised to hear at a recent conference exactly the reverse is true when it comes to social support spending for lower income groups. for seniors and people with disabilities. which raises the question in my mind, would it be better for us to try to rebalance our spending in the direction that allow people to stay in their homes, functioning well instead of institutionalizing them. which is very expensive. >> we need to figure out how to spend more sensibly and efficiently in health care no matter what else happens. because it makes no sense. we know that it can be done in a smarter way. the question about how and how much support structures that i will say that most, not all, most of the people who are now institutionalized and long-term care and other settings, they are there because they have multiple dependencies that are difficult to treat. most of the people were who are able to be treated within
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:00pm EST
it in the competition among brodrick came us to make his fortune, he basically wanted to be a senator. that's what his plan was. tom came along and an assortment of the weirdest guys you ever saw, the worlds ugliest man, have you a chance, murderous, gunslingers, conmen, just absolutely amazing people. i thought it got to write this. as i work in a release we are very close to it the tom sawyer met mark twain in may of 1863 about three blocks from here. the old thing in the same room. twain liked to talk to tom because tom movies free stories and they played cards and drink here matching campaign. so that was the genesis. i thought this has got to be written. so while the series of tiny bits and pieces, diaries and stuff; it's a. but this is a result. i took out as they do, 40,000 words. can you imagine? spicer have over shop may mark, but i do love it. it's the most fun. i guess they could read you some know if you'd like. this may take a second. i've never read in public record. so i'll start with a quote from tom sawyer. this is the. i have to read this unfortunately. you want to know how i come to
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 5:15pm EST
, that's the saloon they used to go to at night, and describe the whole doings, and i'd try to beat his arm by saying i used to play one when i was young. listen to these pranks of mine with great interest, and he'd occasionally take them down in his notebook. one day he says to me, i'm going to put you between the covers of a book some of these days, tom. go ahead, sam, i said. but don't disgrace my name. so that's an interview with the real tom sawyer from the san francisco call in october 23rd of 1898. so he gave multiple interviews. so this is the prologue, and this'll give you an idea of what we were just talking about with the steam bath. it was the first tom sawyer had ever seen mark twain looking glum. sawyer studied the journalist; loose-jointed body with, coarse tumble of fiery hair, long, black, he'dal-looking cigar and soup stringer moustache. a rangy, lanky man, twain didn't really walk but ambled and slouched his way through the muddy streets and back alleys of san francisco. his normal dress was careless and disheveled. his clothings were unbrushed and freckled with tobac
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 6:00pm EST
. my father had been a career army officer for a period in the u.s. army and served in world war ii and korea and later became a hospital administrator. >> so you say conservative, orthodox conservative reform? >> right in the middle. >> did you fight in the 1967 war? >> i was a kid. >> you were a kid. did you fight any war? >> i fought in a couple of them, yes. i fought in the lebanon war. i was quite involved in the lebanon war. i served in the israeli paratroopers. i was in the israeli special forces. >> what year? >> june 1982. wars in the middle east occurred in june, almost to the day. it's probably a good war- fighting weather. i was among the first forces to -- of israeli forces to enter the city of beirut in june 1982. my actual unit was decimated in an ambush and we ended up being attached to all sorts of other units for the duration of the war. later on, i became one of the few israelis to be a veteran of the gulf war. in a period just before the outbreak of the gulf war, i was assigned as a strategic liaison between the army and the u.s. fleet. in the book, i went out th
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 12:00am EST
and their families. so, thank you so much, cynthia, for being here today. why don't we start with you telling us a little bit about yourself. how did you get here? how did you get drawn into the issue? y "bully," why now? >> guest: i come from a background as a writer and when i was in school i was one of those kids who was really shy, and i tried to sail under the radar and i was someone that solid taking place around me and i didn't know what to do about it. and as all of us i think in this country were starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and had no words for it other than adolescents other than growing up. finally people were starting to stand back and say hold on, this isn't actually a normal part of growing up, this isn't a normal right of passage. i think there was a moment when there was a possibility for change, and the director and i decided to start the film out of the feeling that voices were kind of bubbling up coming to the surface to say this isn't something that we can acc
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 12:00pm EST
-bullying activists and experts on how to stop the epidemic of bullying in the u.s. >> host: i'm so delighted to be here today with cynthia lowen, the producer of the widely-acclaimed and really important new documentary "bully" and the co-editor of the book by the same title. both of which out our nation's dirty little secret about bullying in schools across america. both the movie and the book put a human face on what it's about, how it impacts kids on both sides and on the sidelines and their families. so thank you so much, cynthia, for being here today. >> guest: thank you, donna. >> host: why don't we start with you telling us a little bit about yourself. how did you get here? how did you get drawn to the issue? why bully? why you, why now? >> guest: well, i come from a background as a writer, and when i was in middle school, i was one of the kids who was really shy, um, i i think i tried to sail under the radar, and i was someone who i saw bullying taking place around me, and i didn't know what to do about it. and as all of us, i think, in this country were starting to see people coming
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 11:00pm EST
the rest of us. >> guest: you know, that was when he was 15 or 16 years old. and you can see some of those characteristics today in his presidency. there are a lot of reasons for that detachment. part of it has to do with hawaii. he was a native hawaiian and you just keep cool. no matter what else is going on. he had not come ridership with his buddies. best of all, you know, just being cool. it was part of his formative years. he has always had that nature. another aspect is more developed and related, i would say, or politics, which is in this country and all of its racial dynamics and explosiveness, a black person was discussed as being very cool. >> host: how much pot smoking did the president do? >> guest: well, there aren't are particulars. you know, the whole notion of bill clinton saying that he never inhaled -- well when jay leno asked the president about it, you know, without going overboard -- my book documented thoroughly. that is what they did. you know, they had a thing called total absorption, but not only did you inhale, but everything in the car as you were smoking it. the
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 6:00am EST
have a corporation which is me and linda, so that has funds that i can use for all of this stuff. and i do spend, you know, why do it if you're not going to do it thoroughly? i couldn't have done this trip without that kind of a team put together. so, you know, it's not like you get an advance and then go spend it all on vacation. a lot of it goes into the work of making the book. >> the family connections, the obama family connections, as a passive observer, my head is spinning. i don't know who is who. >> okay. that's going to be a challenge for me, to come in this book, for a couple of reasons. one, it's a fairly complicated family web. and the second reason, which is unavoidable is that kenyan names read by readers in the united states can sound, you know, different and harder to remember who is who, et cetera. so i have to be able to deal with that, ma and that's a challenge for any writer. i get some ways i done in the past. you know, essentially what's important to me is not quoting somebody. when you write a long narrative, you're not putting together a string of quotes, this pe
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)